Free Mindfulness Program

How to use this material

This page hosts a step by step program for starting and improving your mindfulness and presence. You don't need a big deal practice to make a big deal difference. The key isn't to have a huge mediation every day in the most perfect place you can find. The key is to simply add more mindful moments into your life every day. And that is easy, delicious, and gets quick results.

A lot of people are struggling with the notion of "being in the present" or being mindful and wonder just exactly what that is like. I've met people that were very frustrated and have tried numerous practices but still didn't have an experience that landed for them as being in the moment. The hand exercise is designed just for such a purpose. The key point is that you this is much easier than you "think" (ha!).

Next, I want to bust the notion that you have to have a huge commitment to meditation or some hour long daily practice. Yes, that helps, but is not required. The article, be mindful, anywhere, instantly suggests that you can do lots of small moments as a very effective practice. Do this. It makes a difference.

Supercharge you conversations presents a powerful yet simple technique to bring more presence into a conversation in real time.

There is a lot more to talk about, and I'll be adding additional posts over time including some guided meditations and more.
Thanks,
Brett

Enlightenment by 1000 yummy moments – or How to be Mindful without really trying

If you think “I just can’t be mindful” – this article is for you.

Ok so you’re not a meditation person, and can’t think of anything worse than trying to sit still focusing on your “feelings”. Seems stupid to try to have some kind of big experience when there’s so much going on and besides, it’s just boring. And all this talk about “accepting the moment”. Hey, things are bad in the world and my rent doesn’t get paid by “accepting” that I owe it. Stuff has to get done! Change needs to happen.

At the same time, there’s a lot of talk about mindfulness, blah blah blah and it would be good to be happier and enjoy life more. But it seems like everything you’ve tried just doesn’t work or isn’t “for you”. And you don’t want to ditch the moral outrage you have about the injustices in the world in order to find peace. What good is peace if you just bury your head in the sand?

I get it. I really do.

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The non-jugdemental part of being non-judgemental

It’s a weird situation. When you start to watch your thoughts, frequently there is a voice that goes something like “dang it – there’s a thought!” or “What am I supposed to be doing”. Frequently this takes the form of self-criticism “I’m no good at this” or “I’m not doing it right”. When this happens and someone reports they have having this kind of experience, my response is “that’s fabulous! You already have enough mindfulness to see the kind of thoughts you’re having and report on them”. And it’s true. I say the same thing to people who start a class by saying “I’m not very mindful”. I’ll say “You may have more than realize! You have enough to know that you could benefit from it and are motivated enough to get to a class, so that’s says a lot about not only your self-awareness, but you intention to do something to improve yourself”. This is often unexpected, and it’s fun for me to observe the different ways people respond to that. (An article for later – being mindful when someone says something nice to you).
 
When you have these inner critic thoughts – it’s just information. “Oh, I go again”. And bring yourself back to just simple awareness. As if you were watching the clouds in the sky. They are not good clouds or bad clouds, just clouds. In the end, you’ve raised your capacity for mindfulness a bit by exercising you mindful neurology and rehearsed how to observe thoughts and feelings, without stepping into those thoughts and feelings. They don’t become the centerpiece, just something passing by.
 
So being non-judgmental as you are mindful is really very important. It’s not a race – there’s no “first place” – but there is a prize.